Moving away from Laravel smoothly (Pros and cons)

A short while back, I was handed a repository with code written in Laravel, incomplete, and somewhat sketchy. with the purpose of taking a look at the code and deciding whether i would take it or not.

To give you the lowdown FIRST, while first researching Laravel, I started by investigating the limitations, my first google search sent me in the direction of a blog post by Beau Beauchamp, a developer who seems familiar with the framework.

I obviously didn’t take his word for it, I don’t really know who he is, so i gave myself a 2 day intensive Laravel course, unfortunately he was somewhat right.

The following two paragraphs are from his blog post, they don’t tell you much, but are better explained as I go

Laravel prides itself as the framework for “artisans”. The impression is that Laravel is the framework for people who don’t really know how to code and don’t want to learn. I get it.

Laravel is not PHP, per se, it uses an “expressive” syntax or what has been coined as “syntactic sugar” to hide things from you that it thinks “artisans” don’t need to worry about.

Having no experience with Laravel, and plenty of experience in PHP, the 2 day course i mentioned earlier left me with the following impressions, I was Impressed by how massive it is (Implementing plenty of features with very few lines), impressed by how simple and easy it is (Truly made for people who don’t want to learn programming). and thinking that this is basically a great framework for a simple straight forward website, but once you are looking to give the website more edge, a competitive advantage, or creating complex functionality, the framework is pretty restrictive and not so scalable.

yes, caching can help with the scalability part, but the degree caching helps with depends on the nature of the website, and for this particular purpose, it is not a perfect solution.

So should we throw the existing code away ?

My answer is NO, if i do end up taking this job, I plan to launch with the Laravel code, then extend the software with good old plain old PHP, with the database acting as the API between the new system and the old system, this way, the website owner can have a functional website where he can promote and advertise, and dip his toes in the water while a different system slowly takes this system’s place as it gets developed.

After updating the existing code from Laravel 7 to Laravel 9 (Overhead), running a security audit for the code, A varnish or nginx proxy should sit in the middle, and new code should run transparently through the proxy, when that happens, I am not even restricted to the same virtual machine running Laravel, I can have 2 virtual machines running different tools acting as one website, transparently, without the user ever knowing.

The front end with react

The other issue I have with this project is with react and react-native, which are the front ends of both web and mobile applications.

React is a very cool framework, but there is quite a bit of controversy around it and around Ajax in general when it comes to Search Engine optimization (SEO), in a statement by google ten years ago, googlebot is now able to read a website the same way a web browser does, and I have seen that they do see it that way from ten years ago when they were providing tools telling people what pages on their websites were having horizontal scroll bars, but regardless of that statement, the fact that most websites that appear in my search results are not Ajax, and that HTML and CSS still run most of the popular websites does raise some concerns, entering into a very competitive market dictates that every inch of a competitive advantage is vital to our success.

So, first let me get the advantages and disadvantages of Laravel out of the way, then get into the technicalities and how the new system should co-exist with Laravel and react.

Pros

  • Laravel is a very mature framework, but very opinionated, opinionated means the designers of the framework expect you to create your website in one specific way, and as long as you are within those lines, you can make things work, what mature and popular means is that when you don’t see those lines, someone online has probably mentioned how to do it with Laravel.
  • Laravel is not the greatest in backwards compatibility, so when a new release comes out, it is not just PHP that you need to worry about, it is also Laravel, and from people’s experiences online, things tend to either break or become buggy when a major release of Laravel is out
  • Laravel is heavy, very heavy, and to deal with that, the developers have come up with workarounds, mainly caching, which lends itself to certain websites more than others, sometimes caching can have so little benefit, and sometimes it is a magic recipe for super snappy
  • Laravel is based on symphony, and works great with react, but even though google has claimed that their spider treats

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.